Mini-Review – The Admiral: Roaring Currents

The Admiral: Roaring CurrentsEdmund and I just saw the South Korean epic, The Admiral: Roaring Currents this afternoon. Right now it’s only playing in a few North American theatres (fewer than 50), despite having done incredibly well in South Korea — more than 15 million admissions and the first local film to gross more than US$100 million. If you have a chance to catch it, I highly recommend it.

I found this movie exciting, vivid,and easy to follow despite its large cast and Korean and Japanese dialogue. The visuals are impeccable and meticulous; there is so much to see, so many details to notice and enjoy. Every frame has a tactile quality to it, you feel it must be real — even the CGI parts.

This is an unusual movie for me to like so much, because it’s a war movie, and it only has one female character (mute, at that!) Yet it was so well paced and so gorgeous that I was swept along (ha-ha.) I’ll be honest, I usually get very confused when I watch war movies; after a while, I just can’t remember who is who and why they’re so angry (viz.: Saving Private Ryan.) But here, in part thanks to the distinctive uniforms and banners of the Korean and Japanese forces, I had no trouble at all despite the complexities of the naval battle. Speaking of which, I felt that Admiral Yi Sunshin’s plans and tactics unfolded at the perfect rate for my brain to catch up with: “Oh, yeah, so that’s what he’s trying to do!”, step by step.

A small detail that helped: the subtitles were very clean, crisp, and legible, and scrolled at the right rate for me to read. There were a few grammatical errors and typos, but nothing egregious. The sound quality was excellent, with a rich auditory landscape that added to the visual textures to complete the sense of reality, of being there. The music was epic and perfectly supported the mood. I felt that this was a momentous time, in a way that few would-be epic movies convey so thoroughly.

In short, I really enjoyed this movie. Good for: history buffs, fans of epic action sagas, those who love portrayals of great leaders tormented by doubt. Bad for: viewers who flinch at gore, people who hate subtitles.

Zeppelin Attack! and other weekend fun

Zeppelin Attack!I confess, I did very little that was actually productive this weekend. I needed the R&R—it’s been hectic at work. The weekend went thus: Friday: play in Edmund’s playtest of my game, the War of Ashes RPG. It’s run via Skype and I have little effort to make since I’m merely a player, not the game master. Saturday: get a haircut, have pot-luck lunch and a game of our DramaSystem series, “To End All Wars,” then go out for teppan with a friend. Sunday: go see Guardians of the Galaxy for a second time on the big screen, and try a game of Zeppelin Attack! since we just got our copy this week along with the Doomsday Weapons expansion.

Zeppelin Attack! can be played with 2 to 4 players, but it was just Edmund and I. We picked our villains at random, I drew Jacqueline Frost and Edmund got Walking Mind. We did many things wrong which we corrected in play, but it’s clear that this is a game that will take a few tries to learn properly. We didn’t really start seeing the synergies between cards until the end. I say “end”, but really we just had to call it and stop because it was getting late. Nevertheless, it seems like there is a lot of tactical play possible. It’s more limited with just two players, I think it will be more fun with three or four because then you have to split your attack and defence strategies.

Playtest Report: Monster of the Week

Monster of the Week coverI’ve talked a few times about the role-playing game Apocalypse World (Lumpley Games, 2010), especially here and here. This month, I get to playtest Generic Games’ hack of the AW system, Monster of the Week, in its most recent version. It’s a short turnaround playtest effort organized by Generic Games’ partner in the U.S., Evil Hat Productions; my understanding is that this new edition will be a chance to release a high-quality print version in the U.S. at reasonable cost, rather than have the choice between good printing but expensive shipping costs from New Zealand, or more affordable but lower quality print-on-demand copies from Lulu.It’s also a chance for author Michael Sands to fine-tune his game.

Like the popular AW hack Monsterhearts, Monster of the Week is meant to emulate urban horror series like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, Supernatural, The X Files, The Dresden Files, or Twenty Palaces. However, where Monsterhearts focuses on the teen angst aspects, MotW places the emphasis on action drama. This is much more to my taste, I like Scooby-Doo stuff for grown-ups.

The game provides a re-write and re-skin of the AW moves, completely different playbooks, a richer History phase that solidly ties the player characters (“Hunters”), and a new stat called Luck that provides resilience but also moves Hunters gradually towards the ultimate fate. Experience is changed from the first edition; while it originally followed the AW model with experience gained for using stats highlighted by other players each episode, it’s now earned for every failed roll instead like in Dungeon World (Sage Kobold Productions, 2012), an approach I like much better. Instead of your character growing for acting out other people’s choices, you now have an incentive to accept failure, which is very true to genre and easier to track.

Another change is that the GM (“Keeper”) uses “mysteries” instead of fronts to create the opposition. They’re mysteries in the most basic sense that they start with something unknown with an agenda, not in the sense of necessitating involved investigative skills like an Agatha Christie murder mystery. Each mystery includes at least one monster, one or more minions, some bystanders, and some locations. A starter mystery is provided, and Generic Games & Evil Hat Productions requested it be playtested, along with the Keeper advice for how to set up a first session. The mystery is called “Dream Away the Time” and is set in the cute New England town of Handfast. This review will contain spoilers, so I’ll place the rest after the cut.

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